Samoa Air fare based on passenger's weight - FOX 35 News Orlando

Samoa Air fare based on passenger's weight

Posted: Updated:
MYFOXNY.COM -

Samoa Air's new policy has a lot of people talking: weigh more, pay more. The South Pacific-based airline claims to be the world's first to charge passengers based on their weight in addition to their luggage.

"It makes it a lot easier for them to understand and also by the time they come back to us a second time around they have had time to digest that information and recognize that its actually the fairest possible system of air carriage that's available and that covers both the cargo and passenger travel," Samoa Air CEO Chris Langton said. "A great benefit for families it makes it easier to work out costs we can carry everything they want on board."

According to the policy, a passenger that weighs about 150 pounds with no baggage will pay about about $85 for a typical flight inside Samoa. A ticket to American Samoa, 250 miles east, would cost about $155.

On Samoa Air's Facebook page, many are calling for a boycott of the airline because of discrimination. Some passengers say the new policy is simply unfair.

Officials from the American Samoa Visitors Bureau say travelers in the region are already weighed before they fly because the planes used between the islands are small. But this is the first time Samoa Air plans to use this policy on international flights.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • Teens want back-to-school gadgets, not clothes

    Teens want back-to-school gadgets, not clothes

    Thursday, August 28 2014 9:52 PM EDT2014-08-29 01:52:52 GMT
    For many students, school starts next week. So what will your teens be asking you to buy? Technology.That's right: they are willing to wear last year's clothes and instead spend money on the latest tech. Gone are the days of securing your status in high school with the right clothes. Now your teens need to own the newest tablet or smart phone and its accessories.
    For many students, school starts next week. So what will your teens be asking you to buy? Technology.That's right: they are willing to wear last year's clothes and instead spend money on the latest tech. Gone are the days of securing your status in high school with the right clothes. Now your teens need to own the newest tablet or smart phone and its accessories.
  • Conference call: your bathroom break

    Conference call: your bathroom break

    We asked several people what they do when they are on a conference call. Most of them answered: "The bathroom." Yes, according to a survey conducted by InterCall, 47 percent of 500 people admitted to taking a conference call from the bathroom.
    We asked several people what they do when they are on a conference call. Most of them answered: "The bathroom." Yes, according to a survey conducted by InterCall, 47 percent of 500 people admitted to taking a conference call from the bathroom.
  • Monitoring your kids' driving in real time

    Monitoring your kids' driving in real time

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 10:46 PM EDT2014-08-28 02:46:07 GMT
    Many new Ford and GM cars have built-in technology that allows you to monitor speed, signaling, and navigation when your child is driving. But when it comes to this type of digital snooping, teens and their parents often have differing opinions. Kids may call it an invasion of privacy. Most parents, of course, will likely feel otherwise.
    Many new Ford and GM cars have built-in technology that allows you to monitor speed, signaling, and navigation when your child is driving. But when it comes to this type of digital snooping, teens and their parents often have differing opinions. Kids may call it an invasion of privacy. Most parents, of course, will likely feel otherwise.
Powered by WorldNow

35 Skyline Drive
Lake Mary, FL 32746

Phone: (407) 644-3535
News Tips: (866) 55-FOX35

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices