Monster hurricane swirling at Saturn's North Pole - FOX 35 News Orlando

Monster hurricane swirling at Saturn's North Pole

Posted: Updated:
The north pole of Saturn, in the fresh light of spring, is revealed in this color image from Cassini.  (NASA) The north pole of Saturn, in the fresh light of spring, is revealed in this color image from Cassini. (NASA)
This false-color image highlights the storms at Saturn's north pole.  (NASA) This false-color image highlights the storms at Saturn's north pole. (NASA)
The spinning vortex of Saturn's north polar storm resembles a deep red rose of giant proportions surrounded by green foliage in this false-color image from Cassini. (NASA) The spinning vortex of Saturn's north polar storm resembles a deep red rose of giant proportions surrounded by green foliage in this false-color image from Cassini. (NASA)
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35 ORLANDO) -

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has provided scientists the first close-up, visible-light views of a behemoth hurricane swirling around Saturn's north pole.

In high-resolution pictures and video, scientists see the hurricane's eye is about 1,250 miles (2,000 kilometers) wide, 20 times larger than the average hurricane eye on Earth. Thin, bright clouds at the outer edge of the hurricane are traveling 330 mph (150 meters per second). The hurricane swirls inside a large, mysterious, six-sided weather pattern known as the hexagon.

"We did a double take when we saw this vortex because it looks so much like a hurricane on Earth," said Andrew Ingersoll, a Cassini imaging team member at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "But there it is at Saturn, on a much larger scale, and it is somehow getting by on the small amounts of water vapor in Saturn's hydrogen atmosphere."

Scientists believe the massive storm has been churning for years. When Cassini arrived in the Saturn system in 2004, Saturn's north pole was dark because the planet was in the middle of its north polar winter.

During that time, the Cassini spacecraft's composite infrared spectrometer and visual and infrared mapping spectrometer detected a great vortex, but a visible-light view had to wait for the passing of the equinox in August 2009. Only then did sunlight begin flooding Saturn's northern hemisphere. The view required a change in the angle of Cassini's orbits around Saturn so the spacecraft could see the poles.

Scientists hope to learn more about Earth's hurricanes by studying this whopper at Saturn.
 
Cassini was launched from Cape Canaveral in 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004.
 

------
 
Online:
 
NASA: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/

Follow us on Pinterest

 

 
 

FOX 35 Weather Authority

Powered by WorldNow

35 Skyline Drive
Lake Mary, FL 32746

Phone: (407) 644-3535
News Tips: (866) 55-FOX35

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices