Tips on tipping - FOX 35 News Orlando

Tips on tipping

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

It took Brendan O'Connor only 89 of his allotted 140 characters to publicly blast a negligent tipper on Twitter and subsequently lose his job. But before getting fired for those itchy fingers O'Connor worked on a food truck.

"A food truck?" Jimmy Skoutelas asked.

That was sort of Fox 5's question too. Forget O'Connor's dismissal. Instead, we wondered: Should one even have to tip after picking up food from a stand, truck or cart? Maybe if the order grows as large (allegedly $170) as the one O'Connor filled?

"I think you have to do it based off not only what you're asking [the server] to provide," Drum Associates Managing Director Carly Drum-O'Neill said, "but the quantity in which you're asking them to [provide] it."

Drum-O'Neill recommended tipping any time someone dispenses a service, which would include when someone prepares food for you on the street.

"It's good business for them the higher the quantity," she said, "but [you] still need to provide some sort of tip in my opinion."

Those we found on the street disagreed.

Always tip a waiter or waitress, they said. Tip a delivery person (although not based upon the price of the order). But don't tip, people said, the person just handing over your meal when you pick it up yourself.

"Because it's quick," Skoutelas said. "I don't really sit down."

For those who never tip, all to whom Fox 5 spoke shared their disdain and issued paying orders for the future.

"Come on, man," Bill Canning said. "Think about the people [who] are working out there. You got to give these people a break."

"You have to try to do better than what you're doing," Alfred Majors said.

"Tip," Drum-O'Neill said. "Give the people some money."

Or else.

Non-tippers would seem wise to hide their identities or risk public shaming (like Saints quarterback Drew Brees experienced when he allegedly left only $3 in gratuity on a $70-something tab) at the fingers of vigilante employees like O'Connor.

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